Primary Wrap-Up

Primary season officially ended at 7pm last night, and the Oconee Democrats would like to take a moment before we all dig into the General Election (November 6th!) to extend our thanks to all candidates for a great race.  Remember, it was only 2 short years ago when Congressman Hice ran unopposed, and we had 3 Democrats in the hunt for his seat this time. We have truly come a long way!

In addition, we Democrats have a lot to be proud of that we had so many women and minorities running for office.  We are truly changing the face of politics for the best!

Of course, the battle is not over, and we have a lot of work to do!  Here is a quick rundown of the general election candidates and their opponents:

Race Democrat Republican
Governor Stacey Abrams Runoff
Lieutenant Governor Sarah Riggs Amico Runoff
Secretary of State John Barrow Runoff
Attorney General Charlie Bailey Chris Carr
Comm. of Agriculture Fred Swann Gary Black
Comm. of Insurance Janice Laws Jim Beck
School Superintendent Runoff Richard Woods
Comm. of Labor Richard Keatley Mark Butler
PSC, District 3 Lindy Miller Chuck Eaton
PSC, District 5 Dawn A. Randolph Tricia Pridemore
US. Rep., District 10 Tabitha Johnson-Greene Jody Hice
State Senator, District 46 Marisue Hilliard Bill Cowsert
State Rep., District 117 Deborah Gonzalez Houston Gaines
State Rep., District 119 Jonathan Wallace Marcus Wiedower

We had some wonderful candidates in the primary season, and it was simply incredible to have so many progressive ideas in the conversation.  It is truly a shame that all candidates can’t win, but in a democracy, that is just how it works. Now is the time for everyone to come together to support our chosen candidates.  Regardless of whether your particular candidate won the nomination, we can all agree that the Democratic nominees are better for our communities than their GOP opponents.

It is worth pointing out that the top state offices will have runoffs on the GOP side, giving Democrats the advantage of campaigning for the General Election (November 6th) NOW while they are still sorting out their candidates.  This is an opportunity we can’t afford to squander!

It may seem like a long time until Election Day (November 6th!), but it will be here before you know it.  All of these fine candidates will be needing your support over the coming months, so please get involved and do what you can to help them succeed!

Did we mention that the General Election is on November 6th?

Oconee Young Dems Host “Good Cause” Tournament for ACTS

Area Churches Together Serving is an  organization supported by local churches to provide food and clothing for the needy.   ACTS accepts referrals from its member churches and others, but also from  Oconee County Social Services Agencies such as DHR and ACTION.

The Oconee Young Democrats from both our high schools are hosting an event to benefit ACTS, an all-abilities Ultimate tournament, fundraiser, and can drive.  Sign up with this form, pay a small ($15) registration fee, and take up a can collection to bring to the tournament on April 15th at 1:00pm at Oconee High School.  We’ll be on the football field and also the practice field.

What is this about?  It’s a benefit for a cause that helps families in Oconee, and a chance for participants to have a fun time, and—

No, I meant what’s this “ultimate” about?  Oh, that.   Ultimate is a really fun and kind of off-beat sport, played with a frisbee .  (Except “frisbee” is a trademark of Wham-O, so it’s played with a “flying disc.”)

There are official rules, but the really short version is that it’s teams of seven on a field with end zones like a football field.  You aren’t allowed to run with the disc, so you have to pass it until someone on your team catches it in the endzone for a point.  There’s a 10-second stall count like baseketball, and anything that isn’t a completed pass is a turnover—the other team immediately gets the disc and tries to score in the other endzone.  So it can be a fast-moving game.

If that’s enough that you want to hear more, but don’t want to wade through the complete rules, there’s “Ultimate in 10 Simple Rules,” if that’s all you need.

Okay… How does this work? We’ll assign you to teams, mostly randomly, but trying to keep the teams balanced according to how strong a player you tell us you are.  If you have a buddy you want to stay with, we’ll try to keep you together (you both have to name each other on your registration forms, though.)  We’re hoping to have enough players for four teams, which means each team gets three games in the tournament.  We’ll have frisbees for the winning team as a prize.  ACTS keeps the donations and proceeds, you go home with bragging rights for having done good.

But I don’t know how to play!  That’s fine; neither do lots of the other people we’re signing up.  We’ll spread out the people who do know, and they can help coach you.  And we’ll run a bit of a clinic ahead of time to explain things.  (Show up early if you want that!)

What should I bring?  Your registration check, running/athletic clothes, soccer cleats if you have them (but no metal, please!), and a good attitude for fun.  A water bottle and maybe some sunblock would be smart.  We’ll have gym “pennies” to tell the teams apart.  Other than that…  cans to donate for ACTS, friends and family to cheer for you, maybe a chair if you don’t like sitting on grass?

Right.  Talk to me about ACTS again?  Area Churches Together Serving.  They provide food to needy families in Oconee and nearby, but also other services as well—clothes, school supplies, that sort of thing.  We’ll have someone from the organization there, too; they’re there to thank all of you for participating, but they can also answer all the questions you have—and tell you how else you can help!

Aren’t “Young Democrats” a political group?  Politics bores me…  That’s fine.  Yes, we are, but this is a charitable event.  Come have fun!

I still have questions… but this is the end of the post!  You can email them to the OCHS Young Dems coordinator, Jennifer Strickland, at  JStrickland@oconeeschools.org

Now, about 2018…

Didn’t we just do this election thing?  And win it?  Well, yes… but that was only the 2017 special election, one race per district to fill the seats vacated by former Representatives Quick and Williams.  There’s still the regular 2018 election, with a whole slate of state, district, county, and local elections, plus our representative in the U.S. Congress.

So… for the first few months of 2018 we’ll have an eye on the Georgia legislative session, and we always have an eye on Congress (which is surprisingly necessary despite so little actually getting done), but… it’s time to talk about the road to November 2018.

Election Calendar

From the Secretary of State’s office, here are the key dates:

  • Voter registration deadline for the Primary: April 23, 2018
  • Primary election: May 22, 2018
    • Primary runoff, if needed, July 24, 2018
  • Voter registration deadline for the General Election:  October 9, 2018
  • General election: November 6, 2018
    • General election runoff, if needed: December 4, 2018

Additionally, although we don’t yet anticipate needing one, there could be a springtime special election on March 20, 2018; if so, its voter registration deadline would be February 20, 2018, and any runoff would be April 17, 2018.  No reason we’d need that, but… you never know.

Open Offices

There are a lot of offices up for grabs; you should consider running.  (We can teach you how,.)

Our candidates page lists the races that we know are currently in contention, but we might have missed one or two.  (Please tell us, by Facebook message or email, if you think we did miss anything!)  But this is the list of all the races we know are open, regardless of whether they have a Democratic challenger yet.

Federal

State

There are enough here that we’re going to separate the legislative, judicial, and executive positions:

Legislative

Judicial (non-partisan election)

  • Judge, state-wide Court of Appeals

Executive

County

  • Superior Court Justice for Athens-Clarke and Oconee Counties, departing incumbent David Sweat
  • County Commissioner Post 2, incumbent Chuck Horton (R)
  • County Commissioner Post 3, incumbent W. E. “Bubber” Wilkes (R)
  • County School Board Post 2, incumbent Amy Parrish (R)
  • County School Board Post 3, incumbent Kim Argo (R)

Local

  • Watkinsville City Council Post 3, incumbent Marcia Campbell
  • Watkinsville City Council Post 4, incumbent Christine Tucker
  • Watkinsville City Council Post 5, incumbent Dan Matthews

(None of Bishop, Bogart, or High Shoals have council seats open in 2018.  Bishop just elected a full slate to four-year terms, so they’re next up in 2021; the others have a half-council up in 2019.)

Interested in Running?

If you are, come to one of our meetings and talk to us about it.  Or contact us on Facebook or via this form to express your interest.

Even if you’re not sure, let us know; we can help you understand what the job would involve, what running for it would involve, and how we can help you do those things.  We can also help train you for the race, and maybe help you find volunteers to staff your campaign…

How Medicaid Cuts Affect Us Here

It seemed a simple question: how would the Republican healthcare bills’ proposed cuts to Medicaid affect us here around Athens, GA?  And how would the various proposed amendments affect us?

It’s been a moving target, and the most recent Senate vote was literally to try to pass an almost unknown and unevaluated bill… but in short, in any variations to date, the bills would cost Georgia money, jobs and the health of many of its citizens.  The bills proposed so far do not directly affect the care people need, or the cost of that care… they only change how much of the total of Medicaid care is paid by the federal government. Using the government’s estimates, under the original Senate plan, by 2026 Georgia would have received $3.7 billion less federal money to pay for Medicaid care.  By 2030 the cumulative estimate is $10.7 billion. This is because the bills include place a lower cap on federal payments that grows less than the expected costs.   So while the government projects the growth rate for total Medicaid costs will be 4.4%, under the senate rules, payments can only increase by 2.4% annually.  The House plan was better in that regard, growing at medical inflation, estimated at 3.7% (but still less than 4.4%).

That’s cost for needed care, and Medicaid patients are, by definition, the poor, the elderly, low-income children, and the disabled; they can’t be expected to pay that much more out of pocket.  So either Georgia would have to come up with that money itself, foregoing other benefits in education, public safety, and infrastructure, or Georgians would have to go without care.  The explicit availability of waivers for coverage of pre-existing conditions, for example, provides one tempting path to resolve the gap… but, one way or another, people would lose coverage.

These people would have to live with chronic conditions and a lower quality of life—until something that hadn’t been a crisis became one.  Sometimes that would be fatal (higher mortality rates from preventable heart attacks, for example), sometimes it would require an emergency room visit.  Hospital emergency rooms cannot legally turn those in need away, but with the proposed changes to Medicaid, they wouldn’t be paid for the care. Increased “indigent care” means hospitals cannot maintain their staff, or update their equipment and services, and may eventually risk bankruptcy and closure. That has ripple effects economically as well as in public health.

What that means for the Athens area

We have two major hospitals in Athens, as well as many individual practices, laboratories, clinics, long-term and elder care facilities, and so on, most of which serve patients on Medicaid across much of northeast Georgia.  Using 2013 numbers, Clarke and its surrounding counties (Oconee, Barrow, Jackson, Madison, and Oglethorpe) contain about 3% of the state’s Medicaid enrollees.  Assuming costs follow that same proportion—which is a risky assumption, I admit—under the Senate plan, the region would lose about 3% of $3.7 billion by 2026: $112 million dollars less spending in the Athens economy.  By 2030, it’s a cumulative $321 million less in Athens.  That is a loss of medical employers investing in their businesses, hiring staff, offering raises; it ripples further to a lack of spending by healthcare workers at other, non-healthcare businesses.  Beyond the economic costs, there would also be a human cost in unmet care for low-income patients, including children and elders. In net,  the region would be sicker overall, and we would suffer losses to the local economy, compared to today’s law.

Looking specifically at the two hospitals, ARMC is Athens’ third largest employer, behind UGA and the county government; St. Mary’s is fifth.  (If you break the school district out from the government generally, they’re second and sixth.)  So, a big cut to Medicaid expenditure in the region is a big loss of revenue for two of our biggest employers.  Assuming we see a resulting increase in unreimbursed emergency care, it likely also results in cuts to other services.  For example, some rural hospitals, required to provide emergency care but underfunded overall, close obstetrics: you might have to go to Atlanta to deliver a baby, or for any of a myriad other non-emergency services we now get locally.

Revisions

Under the Cruz (R-TX) amendment, substandard plans are allowed.  That suggests a dangerous misunderstanding of insurance: any of us might get cancer, or be in a severe car accident, and need ruinously expensive care.  Allowing a tiered system, with a cheaper plan for healthier people, hurts us two ways: the less healthy can’t afford care, and the healthy-but-unlucky can’t either, because their “plan” doesn’t cover their suddenly increased requirements.  The recent Portman (R-OH) amendment does offer some assistance to those losing Medicaid through the loss of Medicaid expansion… but it’s not nearly enough to cover private insurance.

The repeal-only option, also rejected, is irresponsible because it provides no predictability for the insurance market; that can’t help but raise costs.  And in two years or so, should we expect Congress to agree on a replacement, when they’ve proven unable to do so already?

And today’s vote, to debate and then attempt to pass an unknown, un-evaluated variation of bills that already?  That’s irresponsible, too.  Even setting policy aside, if your bill has to be passed in a cloud of secrecy and dark of night… you’re doing something wrong.

Conclusions

Almost nobody likes the House or Senate bills, and they haven’t improved.  Keeping them hidden is worse.  We do have a serious problem with healthcare… but pushing the costs around doesn’t help; we need to address the rising costs themselves, head-on.

None of the Republican do that; they only reduce the federal payments, and would eventually force Georgia to either cut benefits, or to cut other services.  In Athens, that’s hundreds of millions of dollars by 2026; that reduces employment, as well as making people live sicker, unable to afford or unable to access treatment.

There is work we can do to address the actual problem of health care costs directly.  Sadly, many of the most obvious approaches are politically anathema to somebody.  So, rather than addressing the actual problem, Congress is merely passing the buck.  Literally.  And if the states don’t pay it, and patients can’t pay it… then we all go without.

But there is work we can agree on.

  • Medicaid helps patients avoid high-cost care, by offering reliable medication and preventative care.  Paying that “ounce of protection” makes more sense, as public policy, than leaving people sick.
  • If we stop changing the rules, then insurers can plan more accurately; according to those companies, the uncertainty, more than the market itself, has lead to the premium rises and exits from market we here about in the news.
  • Prescription drugs are more expensive in the U.S. than elsewhere.  They’re only about 12% of total medical costs, but the U.S. costs are often about 2-3x, or more, the costs in other developed nations.  So that’s about 6% of our annual medical costs that could probably be saved.  The companies do need to recover their R&D costs… but the U.S.A. doesn’t have to pay so much of it.
  • We can look at unhelpful state regulations.  For example, obstetrics care is expensive, and many pregnancies could be served at home by a midwife… but in Georgia, that is only legal in a hospital setting.
  • Medical insurers, including Medicaid, get negotiated pricing, often half or less of “retail” pricing.  So the uninsured both pay out-of-pocket, and pay higher prices.  Could we cap retail pricing, say to two or three times Medicaid’s (admittedly low) rates?  Doctors should be paid fairly for their time, expertise, facility costs, and risks (including malpractice suits)… but there’s clearly some room between today’s retail pricing, and the practice taking a loss.

A bill that used some of those ideas, or others, to reduce medical costs… that would offer some improvement.  It is, sadly, not to be found in Congress today.  Or at least there’s no reason to expect it, in the mystery box currently proposed.

Blood Drive 5/17 at Oconee Veteran’s Park

The Red Cross is collecting blood donations in the Community Room at Oconee Veteran’s Park, Wednesday May 17 between 11am and 4pm.  Walk-ins are welcome!

Each pint donated can save up to three lives.  Most people over 18 are eligible to give blood… if you have questions, follow these links to the Red Cross for answers to frequently asked questions and a special page for first-time donors.

This drive is co-sponsored by the Rotary Club of Oconee County and by Oconee County Parks & Recreation Department.